A few weirdos

Here a few more things I painted for Ral Partha Legacy, just for fun. Not sure if they’ll ever make it to their web catalog but they were neat minis to paint. They’re from the “Savage and Sparkle” line, originally released by Thunderbolt Mountain. The story appears to be that Tom Meier had his kids design some figures.

First up is “Slug Eat-Your-Face.” I think that’s both his name and what he does. The model is based on an original idea by Meier’s son.

I painted him like a banana slug. They really made an impression on me when I visited Humboldt County, California, years ago.

RPL asks that all their models for the volunteer painting project be undercoated in black. This absolutely improves how they photograph, not least because areas that are inadvertently missed by the paintbrush show as black (rather than white, as is the case with my own figures).

Nest up are a small family of “Woolies.” Unnatural fur colors made sense to me — they remind me a bit of Muppets.

I’m happy with how their eyes turned out, especially the one with an open mouth. Its eyes are kind of rolling back, like a shark’s.

Published in: on September 26, 2022 at 6:00 pm  Leave a Comment  
Tags: ,

Chaos horde for Ral Partha Legacy

These were also painted for Ral Partha Legacy. Assorted Chaos Warriors.

Three knights, mounted on elephants.

The elephants were originally used for an ogre/giant rider, but these knights fit nicely.

Jacob at RPL was so happy with their look that he asked me if I’d do more in the same color scheme: black, red, and gold. I made the gold reddish by glazing it with some thinned down Citadel “speed-paint.”

Unfortunately, I couldn’t quite replicate the process and I feel like these turned out a bit drabber. I must have undercoated the elephants’ armor in white, which I did not do for the rest. (To be fair, RPL does ask for black undercoating as it makes for better photos and a consistent look to their armies.)

Most of the figures he sent were Tom Meier sculpts I recognized from the later period of the original Ral Partha, obviously influenced by Tom’s time in England with Citadel and the market trend of scale creep, but still distinctively Meier sculpts.

I have to admit that I never liked the wide stances on some of these, as you can’t really fit them onto standard bases (1″ round or square for RPGs, or 20-30mm deep stands for WRG type games).

The axe-men kind of grew on me, though, and could be perfect Chaos Thugs for Warhammer.

My favorites are guys with the spiked mace and the ones with the horned helmets. The mace-men look like serious villains. The axe-men remind me strongly of Peter Mullen‘s illustration style — stark, angular, and lanky rather than bulky even in armor.

The “command” group are a bit smaller than the knights, but have their own baroque charm.

This pair seems to be loosely based on Frazetta’s Death Dealer. I have the much older “Superhero” that was based on another version of the Death Dealer, though the detail is not very crisp. Beyond Ral Partha’s two versions, I think there are at least a half dozen other figures based on him as well.

This one was a big surprise. The Black Prince, a familiar Ral Partha character, but mounted on some kind of brontothere.

The whole horde arrayed.

Published in: on September 25, 2022 at 10:00 am  Leave a Comment  
Tags: ,

New recruits for the Army of Darkness

The very first miniature I remember buying was a skeleton. A hobby shop in town had several of the Grenadier large boxed sets open under the counter, and you could buy a loosey for $1. I picked the skeleton with a sword raised over his head — a very simple sculpt, and, it turned out, very fragile. But I had loved skeleton decorations at Halloween, and was kind of obsessed with drawing them and so on to the extent that my parents briefly thought I wanted to be a doctor when I grew up. Anyway I have slowly been working getting all my undead figures painted, and earlier this year I hacked away at the cavalry and a few other larger pieces. Photo dump!

These ghostly riders are a pair of Prince August undead riders I cast from a mold and a Heritage undead rider from the Knights & Magick range.

Since I have the mold and lots of metal, I made a handful of riders to fill out the ranks. These are painted more like traditional skeletonmen. The shield for the rider is, unfortunately, where they decided to place the main sprue opening (where you pour in the molten metal) so so several of them I just added a plastic shield rather than try to reconstruct the demon face that is supposed to be on the small heater shield.

 

I also decided to repair and touch up some skeleton cavalry I painted in the early 1990s. These are all Grenadier — the first two from boxed sets and the others from Fantasy Lords blister packs.

This big fellow I painted for Ral Partha Legacy. They sent me another as payment, but I haven’t decided if I want to use undead crew or not. Since this one has skeletons crewing it, I tried to make the mammoth look like he’d been revived from the dead too — hence the bluish skin on the trunk and eyelids and blood seeping from the ear. I probably should have added some gore or ribs poking through the coat, but I didn’t want to aler the model in case they use it in their catalog rather than just for convention games.

These next ones are all Grenadier — two zombie riders and good old Napoleon Boneyparts on the litter. I have a second Napoleon with a bunch of other skeletons added to a large base for use in wargames, but I when I chanced to get this copy I decided to try to leave leave him as cast. Like the Prince August riders above, I went for “speed painting” on these.

The rest of these are conversions and kitbashes. First up, a Dragontooth figure, called “Rictus, the zombie king.” Mine was lacking his sword and head. I gave him a Citadel plastic head and left his hand empty, as if he’s waving his troops onward.

I have very, very few Dragontooth minis in my collection. I never saw them in stores and the company folded in the 1980s. The few I have turned up in assorted job lots. They are certainly crude, but have a ton of personality. Tom Loback, who did most of the sculpts, was a serious artist and worked on all kinds of things after he got out of miniatures, including building driftwood statues that he left, unsigned, along the river near his home.

Next up is a kit bash using a Grenadier horse, Rafm shield, Maurauder rider, and an arm supplied by figure from the Lionheart game. He was also speed-painted and the photos show a lot of imperfections, but at least he’s not a pile of loose bits any more.

The last was a very long term project. The cart driver is a Citadel figure I chanced to pick up in a bag of bits at an Origins convention in 2003 or 2004. I’d been planning to build my own version of the plague cart since I first saw it in a white dwarf in the 80s or 90s, but the kit was so expensive. A year or two ago I realized I finally had all the bits I’d need.

The horse is a Eureka mini from their Chaos Army line. The bottom of the cart was a partial wagon from a Heritage kit for an orc war-drum. I scratch-built the yoke and poles, rather crudely. The sides of the wagon are from a skeletal dragon. I had just the tail, neck, and ribs from a job lot I  bought online.

The banner is from a Reaper kit — it was to be carried by a wraith, who I instead armed with a sword. The additional bits (skulls, heads, etc.) are from Games Workshop and Zvedza plastic kits.

The cargo is a coffin from a Minifigs kit — I built mine using the pile of bones instead, so I had this loose coffin.

I did eventually finish the bases on these with flocking and grass tufts, not pictured.

Published in: on September 23, 2022 at 5:30 pm  Leave a Comment  
Tags: , , , , ,

More orc & goblin cavalry

Still terrible photos from my phone but here are the rest of the orc & goblin cavalry I’ve finished.

First up: some boar riders. These are some Citadel figures — an orc and a goblin.

The next two are from a company I have found very little about. They were called Enigma, naturally. They had a short run in late 1990s, making figures that were chunky knock-offs of Citadel’s Warhammer Fantasy and 40k lines. They always came with solid metal bases that were separate from the figure, but with no slots or points to attach them. These two are a leader/boss type and a shaman.

Net up various conversions. The first two are Milton Bradley/Games Workshop BattleMasters figures mounted on toys — in this case a chicken and a rat. They were pretty fun to do.

The next two are Ral Partha hobgoblins which were meant to ride boars as well. I used one boar to draw my Grenadier orc beer wagon, and the other I use without the rider, so these two needed mounts. I used some home-cast horses from Prince August molds for them, and I think they look pretty good.

 

This next figure was really beast, both to assemble and to paint. It’s a very old Grenadier war mammoth. The mahout is original (I think it’s an orc or hobgoblin?) but the two crew are from the AD&D Orcs Lair set. The axe-man in that set breaks easily and mine has a pike to replace it.

Here’s a look at the crew before I glued them into the howda.

Lastly, an orc riding a dragon from the Grenadier Fantasy Lords line. I repainted this one as the paint was worn off in several spots.

Published in: on September 22, 2022 at 5:30 pm  Comments (2)  
Tags: , , , , , , ,

Wolf riders

Long time no posts. I have been painting here and there though. Here’s a photo dump of some orc and goblin cavalry — all wolf riders. Assorted other mounts to follow.

First up, some really old Custom Cast figures: Warg Riders from the Der Kriegspielers line. I had a few from an earlier lot, and they were bolstered by a set of someone gifted to me. They have a mix of bows, axes, and spears.

The giant pumpkin heads on them are great.

I also painted a bunch of wolf riders for Ral Partha Legacy. Below are some archers (the ones I sent in to RPL; they sent me a set of similar figures as “payment” but I haven’t taken pictures of them.

There were the first wolves I really tried to give something approximating a realistic coat to. In the past I always just did them uniformly black or grey, but for these I checked a reference photo of a wolf and tried to follow that.

 

Before I did the archers, I did a group with hand weapons. I don’t seem to have photographed them, but here are the “payment” set. I based them on 1.5″ poker chips, and later added flocking.

Here’s a group shot with a few that I didn’t photograph separately, and a couple of oddballs on nonwolves.

Finally, a line up of wolf riders showing some variations. The far left one is a Tom Meier sculpt, recently released by Ral Partha Legacy. I think they may have been originally intended to be part of his Thunderbolt Mountain line, before it shut down in 2017.

The next one is a Nick Lung wolf rider from Grenadier’s Fantast Warriors line.

Next to him, with the axe, is a very early Ral Partha wolf rider, also sculpted by Tom Meier decades before the Legacy one, perhaps around 1978. He is also re-released by Ral Partha Legacy, though my copy is from the 70s.

And last is one of the Custom Cast again, from about 1976 I think.

 

Published in: on September 21, 2022 at 5:30 pm  Leave a Comment  
Tags: , , , , ,

“I did my own research!,” or, Lead rot by any other name

In an online forum*, there was some discussion of the best storage methods for older metal figures. They’re usually made of a mix of an alloy of lead, tin, and various other metals such as antimony, bismuth, zinc, and so on. Many collectors have noted that some figures begin to show signs of corrosion where the metal begins to “rot” away turning into a powdery, greyish dust. Hobbyists have long called this “lead rot” and discussed the best ways to prevent it and whether it is possible to salvage miniatures with signs of lead rot. The consensus has been that lead reacts, particularly in the presence of moisture and/or extreme temperature, with acid vapors to start a self-sustaining** process of corrosion. That is, the products of the corrosion include more acid vapor that in turn corrodes more of the lead. The main culprits most often cited are wood and wood products like carboard “outgassing” acetic acid and tannins. PVA (“white”) glue, certain other materials possibly including the foam used in miniatures packaging, and so on are also implicated. The most frequent advice is to discard affected miniatures, although some will describe a process of neutralizing the acids and scrubbing away the corroded lead as a fix, with a more involved process using mineral spirits and other chemicals described by some toy soldier enthusiasts. Prevention measures are priming and/or sealing the miniatures, storage in plastic or metal containers, and good ventilation and/or desiccants in the cases.

Indeed there is a pretty well-established folklore about these topics, so I was surprised to see one commenter argue pretty strenuously that “lead rot” is not a real thing. The commenter has a history of working with various manufacturers. I can’t tell if they were ever an employee of them or more on the periphery as a consultant, freelance, etc. — they do however seem to have real contacts going way back and some insider knowledge. I am not naming them because some of their comments seem to have been deleted and their profile  seems to indicate a preference for privacy.

But the gist of their comments were that:

  1. the scientific literature does not describe “lead rot” or use the term, and even Wikipedia has no article on “lead rot
  2. zinc pest” and “tin pest” on the other hand are well-known in the literature (and on Wikipedia) and have similar presentations (metal corroding into a white powder/dust in a self-sustaining and irreversible process)
  3. in fact all cases described as lead rot are really zinc pest or tin pest, due to poorly made alloys and bad advice on cost-savings in the mixture of metals
  4. the original source for all the folklore on lead rot was a retracted article that is no longer published on the site it first appeared on

I am not a chemist and don’t pretend to be one. I am however a librarian and take an interest in rooting out disinformation and finding sources. So while I am not really competent to evaluate the chemistry involved, I am able to examine the four claims. I went with the easiest first: 4, the retracted article.

A search of the Retraction Watch Database (admittedly not comprehensive, but a good start) didn’t turn up any retracted scientific articles on lead corrosion. I was pretty sure I knew the article the commenter was talking about: a museum conservator’s report on the corrosion of lead components of ship models. It was formerly hosted here: http://www.dt.navy.mil/cnsm/lead_01.html but is now here: https://www.navsea.navy.mil/Home/Warfare-Centers/NSWC-Carderock/Resources/Curator-of-Navy-Ship-Models/Lead-Corrosion-in-Exhibition-Ship-Models/. That the old link is broken is no surprise to librarians, we’ve been discussing “link rot” since the world wide web debuted. I could find no evidence that there was any effort to “retract” this article, and suppose that the fact that the original link is most commonly given on web pages discussing lead rot, the commenter simply misunderstood the situation.

Point 1, that “lead rot” is not part of the scientific lexicon, is technically true. A federated search of many databases available through my university library*** turned up no articles using the phrase “lead rot”. However it should be noted that it’s often the case that popular usage and technical jargon is not always the same. Searching instead for articles about lead corrosion in the presence of acetic acid led me to a host of articles discussing the phenomenon, how to measure it by various methods, and most address conservation issues specifically. To be fair, the focus for these articles tend to be organ pipes and museum artifacts like lead seals. However, the articles do tend to confirm that that acetic acid (and other organic acids such as formic acid, a product of formaldehyde reacting with other chemicals in the air) catalyze lead corrosion. At least one paper does describes the reaction: Misallamova et al. (2019):

Lead and acetic acid, in the presence of oxygen, produce lead acetate and water; lead acetate reacts with carbon dioxide and water to produce another lead compound (some kind of lead carbonate — presumably known as the lead rot) and acetic acid. However this only described as “active corrosion,” and a chemist friend points out that this doesn’t qualify as autocatalytic, just catalysis, as the first equation produces one molecule of the lead compound and the second requires three molecules. I think that since the second shows three acetic acids, in the real world we could expect the reactions to be self-sustaining provided there is enough humidity and carbon dioxide present, and no ventilation, but again, I’m not a chemist.

As an aside, I’d also note that the existence or lack of a Wikipedia page is doesn’t carry a lot of weight in this controversy. I suppose this was just a simple way to show that there is not much use of the term “lead rot” outside the hobby.

Point 2 seems correct. Cornelius et al. (2017) notes that lead-tin alloys are resistant to tin pest, and indeed lead-tin solders are used in electronics for this reason (they are no longer allowed in plumbing due to toxicity). However tin pest can still occur in lead-tin alloys, so extremes of cold should be avoided. However as tin pest is supposed to occur at very low subfreezing temperatures, I find it hard to believe it’s an issue outside the arctic and Antarctic. Moreover tin pest is more of a crumbling as the tin molecules form a fragile crystalline structure, so it would not look much like lead rot.

I didn’t find much about zinc pest, but it does occur here and there in the literature.  Zinc pest hand just needs water so that could certainly form in damp places which would also be prone to lead rot.

Point 3 seems partly true. Plumbridge (2008) notes that lead-tin alloys were especially resistant to tin pest (no pest after 4 years at -18 Celsius, but another sample at -40 Celsius did show changes). Moreover the tin pest shown in his alloy tests are more of a disintegration into pieces rather than dust. But it seems likely that various alloy mixes will show different kinds of corrosion. Anecdotally, however, lead rot is not claimed to occur in lead-free alloys, but I’d expect that if folks really didn’t know the difference we’d be hearing about lead rot in them.  Interestingly, Gibson and Watt (2010) report that even a small tin content (1.2% or more) increases the resistance to lead corrosion by acetic acid, so lead/tin miniatures which may have 30% or more tin seem to be poor candidates for lead rot. Anecdotally, early miniature manufacturers were using anything they could find cheaply — a newspaper article on Ral Partha quotes the owner saying they used an alloy consisting of 80% lead before switching to the almost pure tin Ralidium.

Lastly, another commenter on the thread pointed out that the phenomenon of lead rot is remarkably similar to the manufacture of “white lead.” This is well-known process of exposing lead to vinegar fumes in order to produce a white compound for use as a pigment in paint. Vinegar after all is mostly water and acetic acid.

My hunch is that the original commenter was trying to point out that zinc pest and tin pest are problems that can present as something a lot like lead rot, and that it is the cheapest metals (high lead alloys or even pure lead) that are prone to lead rot. Moreover, tin pest is considered autocatalytic in the sense that the reaction will continue using only its own products, while lead rot is more dependent on the continuation of favorable conditions. (Good news! Ish.)

I’ll write up something a bit more thorough at some point in the future, but my references below should be a good starting point for anyone else interested in “lead rot.”

=======

*more specifically, a Facebook group; yes I know I should probably get off Facebook and social media generally

**Apparently the correct term is “autocatalytic” — the reaction products include a catalyst for the same or a related reaction

***My university is pretty strong on chemical engineering, and even has a corrosion engineering program, which the library supports as best it can by buying access to relevant resources

=========

Selected References

Cornelius, B., Treivish, S., Rosenthal, Y., and Pecht, M. (2017). The phenomenon of tin pest: A review. Microelectronics Reliability 79: 175–192.

Deflorian, F., and Fedel, M. (2013) Electrochemical analysis of the degradation of lead alloy organ-pipes due to acetic acid. Journal of Cultural Heritage 14: 254–260.

Gibson, L.T., and Watt, C.M. (2010). Acetic and formic acids emitted from wood samples and their effect on selected materials in museum environments. Corrosion Science 52:172–178.

Misallamova, S., Kouri, M., Strachotova, K.C., Stoulil, J., Popova, K., Dvorakova, P., and Lhotka, M. (2019) Protection of lead in an environment containing acetic acid vapour by using adsorbents and their characterization. Heritage Science 7(76). https://doi.org/10.1186/s40494-019-0317-3

Niklasson, A., Johannsson, L.-G., Svensson, J.-E. (2008) The influence of relative humidity and temperature on the acetic acid vapour-induced atmospheric corrosion of lead. Corrosion Science 50: 3031–3037.

Plumbridge, W. J. (2008) Recent Observations on Tin Pest Formation in Solder Alloys. Journal of Electronic Materials 37 (2): 218-223.

Plumbridge, W.J. (2010) Tin pest in lead-containing solders. Soldering & Surface Mount Technology 22 (1): 56–57.

Published in: on January 9, 2022 at 10:48 am  Comments (8)  
Tags: ,

The Compleat Orc’s Lair

At long last, I’ve finished painting my collection of Grenadier AD&D orcs! I got the original “Orc’s Lair” way back in the 1980s when it first came out, and as I recall the shaman was broken, but it had an extra axeman in the box, so no complaints. An “Action Art” set acquired some time later had another orc captain (which for some reason I remember having a more ostentatious name in the painting guide). Since then, I acquired a few more of each pose secondhand in game shops, in large “job lots” I bought online, in trades, and a few outright gifts from people who didn’t want them any more.  My original crew were painted back in the 80s, and mostly in the bright green used in the box art. For the rest, I decided to paint them in a more muted olive tone, but kept the dominant black and reds used for the originals so they look more uniform.

These orcs are all more ape-like (as drawn by Jeff Dee in modules at the time) than pig-faced (like the Monster Manual illustration), which is also more in line with Tolkien style orcs. They are also considerably less bulky than most orc miniatures. I like the mish-mash of weapon and armor styles, suggesting it is all looted gear.

The crouching short swords men were never my favorite pose. These came in both the boxed Orc’s Lair and separate blister pack of five figures, which may explain why I have so many. They are simply more common than some of the others.

The archers only appeared in the boxed set. I actually have one more who will serve as a crewman on an even older Grenadier war mammoth. 

The two axemen broke fairly quickly after I got them — the axe handle was somewhat thin. The thirc I acquired later was already broken. So all have new weapons grafted on: a plastic axe head, a plastic sword blade, and a broken bit from a later Grenadier goblin figure. The axeman, like the short sword, was both in the box and the blister, so they should be fairly common as well. I have a fourth (also broken, of course) who is also serving as a mammoth crew with a pike.

The swordsmen were in both boxes and blisters, so they ought to be common. It’s a decent pose and would good for wargame stands.

The “captain” should be the most common by far, as he was in the box, the blister, and a large “Action Art” box set of monsters. The one in the center had his axe replaced but the rest are intact. I always liked this pose, and the crested helmet.

The war-club orcs were only in the small box, so it’s surprising that I have four of them. I like the vaguely Aztec theme. One had a broken club and I replaced with a plain, rather than obsidian-studded, club.

The last trooper with a mace appeared only in the blister pack, and is the only one I have just one of. Presumably he’s the rarest of the AD&D orcs. 

The “Command” types are all pretty nice too. The shaman has a skull and some kind of spike club or rattle made from a bone. This club was also break-prone so one has a replacement (on the left) and for the other (on the right), I carved the back of the handle into a a curved knife which you can’t see from this angle. The center shaman is intact.

The standard bearers are both lightly converted. (I was very confused, as a kid, that this fellow was labelled “standard” on the box, since I thought they were saying this what a “standard/tpyical” orc would look. Only a bit later did I learn that a standard was a banner or unit insignia. On the left, I converted the club to a sword for reasons I no longer remember. The club certainly didn’t break off on its own. The other has a standard from a Heritage kit (the Middle Earth orcs with a drum on a cart). I was missing his standard, and this one was superfluous so it was a luck meeting.

Lastly the “leader” types (or in some boxes, he’s labeled the “captain” and the captain above is an “axeman,” and the axeman is a “w/waraxe”). His axe broke on both models as well, so one got a replacement from a Prince August mold and the other has a warhammer from a Ral Partha dwarf (who in turn was converted to hold an axe to match a player’s character in some long ago game). Another very menacing pose despite the relatively small stature of these orcs.

And here’s how they all go into storage in a small bead organizer.

 

 

 

Published in: on August 4, 2021 at 6:00 pm  Comments (1)  
Tags: , ,

Wolf riders

Here’s the second batch of minis I painted for Ral Partha Legacy. They are a relatively more recent vintage — Thunderbolt Mountain minis from the mid 2000s.

Thunderbolt Mountain was an independent venture by Ral Partha’s best and arguably most famous sculptor, Tom Meier. Meier was a sort of ‘wunderkind’ for Ral Partha, starting as teenager and introducing techniques that allowed him to sculpt much more realistic proportions and details than the competitors in the mid 1970s. Only Superior Models really rivalled Ral Partha’s classic ranges from 1977 to 1979, in my opinion. When Meier left Ral Partha around 1988, he started the Thunderbolt Mountain line, which produced several historical and fantasy ranges. Towards the end of Thunderbolt Mountain’s run, he did elves and goblins in a slightly larger scale than his 25mm Ral Partha but in a similar and recognizable style. RPL is recasting these as well as the older Ral Partha lines. I was stoked to be able to get the wolf riders to paint for the RPL armies.

Like the Rakshasas, I painted these beginning with a black undercoat. This photographs pretty well and is very forgiving, although the colors can get a little muted. Truth be told, I spent more effort on the wolves than the riders, because I don’t think I’ve ever painted realistically colored wolves before. I tried to give them a distinctive brown stripe along the back, gray fading to black on the belly and limbs, and reasonably accurate facial markings. The black undercoat makes them look suitable filthy — I doubt these goblins spend much time worrying about their own hygiene, let alone grooming their mounts.

They came with a bonus goblin on foot, wearing a wolf skin. I’m not sure if he simply outlived his mount or ate it.

All the minis came with open hands and assorted scimitars for the riders and clubs for the footman. as well as separate shields. I gave two clubs to the footman because I couldn’t decide between the crude spiked club and the Iroqouis style war club.

The poses are very dynamic, even for Meier, and the details are great.

Jacob at RPL also sent a few extras minis which I’ll start on some time later this summer when I have time to paint again. Right now I’m focusing on getting my house ready to sell and looking for a bigger place, so the figures are getting packed away for a while.

 

Published in: on March 22, 2021 at 8:00 pm  Comments (2)  
Tags: ,

Rakshasas

I’m kind of excited to be painting these Rakshasas. They were originally produced in the Ral Partha “The Adventurers” line, a series of small boxed sets. The second monster set had these two poses of an armored gnoll — one with a scimitar and one with a spear. This was the first RP boxed set I bought, largely on the strength of the fact that it listed two skeletons and a minotaur as well. I painted my original pair as gnolls, although they looked a bit small and more feline than hyena-ish; moreover they are kind of short for gnolls, who should stand around 7′ tall, while these are the height of an average human in scale.

Anyway Ral Partha Legacy is setting the record straight and re-releasing these as Rakshasas. D&D players know Rakshasas as supernatural, man-eating monsters. The AD&D Monster Manual does not describe their appearance, but the accompanying illustration of a tiger-headed man has mostly stuck into later editions. I can see some tiger-like qualities to their faces.

I feel honored to have been trusted to paint this set for RPL (full disclosure, volunteer painters get a free set of the same models they paint for the catalog/conventions). They came with halberds for the spearmen rather than the standard piano wire spears that the original had. I like this change. If Ral Partha Legacy is satisfied with these, I’d be happy to try something else for them.

Here’s the progression of how it went.

Bare metal glues to cardboard for painting. That is how I painted units for wargaming when I had my wargaming jag, although these will get more careful detailing and shading than I would normally use for wargames armies.

rakshasas, unpainted

First I primed them black, as requested, and blocked in the steel for their armor (dry-brushing) and the brown weapon hafts and shield backs.

rakshasas, primed and metal

Then I added a dark blue for their shield faces and pants. I decided to paint the boots the same color to suggest a uniform, as they are all standing in a very disciplined pose. Gold details on the armor and maroon straps and belts add some more color.

colors blocked in

Then I applied a dark wash over their armor, some highlighting on the blue clothes, and painted the exposed fur orange. For the fur I painted the areas ivory/white, then applied a thick orange wash.

more color added

Finally I detailed the tiger pattern on their faces (white chin, snoot, cheeks, and “eyebrows”) and added yellow-dotted eyes. Their paws got some white detailing too. There wasn’t really much exposed fur that would have black stripes, but I did add them to their forearms.

back of a rakshasa

Finally I took them off the carboard bases I was using to hold them and touched up any areas I’d missed. Then they got a light coat of Dullcote, as requested. I would normally use a few heavier coats of matte sealer but Ral Partha Legacy will want to base them according to their standards,  which makes a lot of sense as that will help blend all the different painting styles of the volunteers doing their armies. I assume they’ll add another layer of Dullcote after that.

Here is what I’m sending in:

Not the best photo but I hope they’ll approve.

Published in: on February 15, 2021 at 8:00 pm  Comments (6)  
Tags: , , ,

The Chaos Army arrayed

I finally finished my whole collection of the Eureka “Chaos Army.” There are a couple of giants that I don’t have, but otherwise this is the whole range. 

The heavy “cavalry” are these three barrel-riders. The pig-man has a spit-roasted pig, surely some kind of statement. The herald on the far left has an assistant holding a trumpet to his arse, and a curly pig tail peeks out from his tights. The one in the center is the strangest; some sort of demon inside a huge melting helmet, and instead of being on sled, the barrel is propelled by whatever is inside.

The giant, “Little Olaf the Unsteady,” has an assistant to help stabilize his schnozz.

“Emperor Rat robed in meat” rides the “flogged horse,” easily the goriest figure in the bunch.

I posted these five imps or goblins on flayed dogs last time.

Pope Simius provides immoral support.

“Brood Hilda” herds the children of chaos: The Flapper Twins, Ugly Betty, and Chick Lewis.

Kaiser Buddha, the Chaos Lord, watches benevolently.

The more monstrous one serve as light light infantry.

 

The humanoid ruffians serve as heavy infantry with assorted weapons, including an outsized table knife, a feather, a huge spoon, and a brass key. 

 

 

 

 

Published in: on February 8, 2021 at 6:59 pm  Leave a Comment  
Tags: , ,
Wayne's Books

Game Gallery ~ Photo Blog

Ann's Immaterium

Mostly physical culture but also writing, gaming, and other dark procrastinations

Skarloc´s

Collecting, modelling, painting and wargaming in 28mm

Dragons Never Forget

What were we talking about again?

This Stuff is REALLY Cool

Young scholars enthusiastic to tell you about COOL RESEARCH STUFF

Fail Squad Games

Tabletop games and adventures

Chuck Wendig: Terribleminds

Hey Did You Know I Write Books

Save Vs. Dragon

"We are here on Earth to fart around. Don't let anybody tell you any different."--Kurt Vonnegut

POWER WORD KILL

Old School Roleplaying and related musings

Hobgoblin Orange

My return to the world of miniature figure painting and RPGs

booksandopinions.com

The Book Reviews You Can Trust!

Dawn of the Lead

Miniature wargaming and the occasional zombie

WordPress.com News

The latest news on WordPress.com and the WordPress community.

hosercanadian

Miniature Motivation

Take On Rules

Jeremy Friesen - a poor soul consumed by gaming.

Age of Dusk

A blog that only kills animals.

Roll to Disbelieve

"We are here on Earth to fart around. Don't let anybody tell you any different."--Kurt Vonnegut

A Book of Creatures

A Complete Guide to Entities of Myth, Legend, and Folklore

Making the Past

Diary of an apprentice swordsmith

Ancient & Medieval Wargaming

Using De Bellis Antiquitatis, with the odd diversion...

Riffing Religion

Prophets should be mocked. I'm doing my part.

Cirsova

Magazine of Thrilling Adventure and Daring Suspense

2 Warps to Neptune

Surveying the Gen X landscape and the origins of geek

Dagger and Brush

Miniature painting, wargaming terrain tutorials, reviews, interviews and painting guides

Fractalbat

A lair for gaming, sci-fi, comics, and other geekish pursuits.

tenfootpole.org

I bought these adventure and review them so you don't have to.

9th Key Press

Maps, supplements, and inspiration for roleplaying games.

The Rambling Roleplayer Archives

This site is no longer being updated. Check out the new site at www.rpgrambler.com

The History Blog

History fetish? What history fetish?

Sheppard's Crook

The occasional blog of a closet would -be wargamer and modeller

Yesterweird

A catch all of books, games, and sundry other interests

The Weekly Sift

making sense of the news one week at a time

%d bloggers like this: