A few of my favorite things

A freind asked me recently what my favorite miniature was and of course I couldn’t even begin to answer. I usually think of my Grenadier AD&D “Dragon’s Lair,” but while I’m certainly proud of it, I don’t really have a lot memories associated with and painting it was more of a duty than enjoyable. I might also think of my orcs, which I have a lot of, or my skeleton army, which I really like too, but most of them were painted without a lot of care and only really look good as an army. After a little thought though I realized my favorites must be the figures that always end up on display on the wally. I have an old “printer’s drawer” that can hold a lot of minis, but it is an antique and I always worry about overloading in. More recently I picked up a small display that I imagine was made for thimbles or shot glasses at a rummage sale. Some of my favorite adventurers, and a few monsters, are displayed prominently on it in my gaming area.

The red velvet backing and arches really class it up, huh?

L to R, top: Citadel dwarf (one of my all-time favorite dwarfs), Grenadier hireling, Reaper fighter or paladin; bottom: Citadel knight Templar, Grenadier archer, Grenadier gnome illusionist.

L ro R, top: Heritage knight, Minstril from Groo the Wanderer (Dark Horse), bottom:  Heritage elf, Heritage knight, TSR fighter.

Grenadier thief, Grenadier halfling lookouts, Ral Partha gnome, Reaper mushroom king, Grenadier fighter, Grenadier efreet.

Grenadier halfling, Grenadier thief, Grenadier magic-user, Citadel chaos warrior, Grenadier goblin hero, Heritage sorcerer.

Some of these are pretty well painted in my humble opinion, though some are pretty crude. The chaos warrior actually placed in painting competition at a convention in the late 1980s, though I knew he was not up to snuff compared to what I was seeing in White Dwarf. He’s served as a half-orc fighter many times since, as has the goblin next to him. Apart from those two, I believe the rest of the paint jobs are less than 10 years old. I’d say I’ve gotten a lost faster, and perhaps more garish in my colors and contrast, but I’m not sure I’ve gotten much better. But I’m on track to at least finish painting all my figures before I go blind, so there’s that…

Published in: on March 13, 2017 at 5:00 pm  Comments (4)  
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Clerics

Last weekend I painted four clerics in between chores and doing a ton of preparation on other figures. One thing I’m trying out is putting grout in the bottoms of the plastic bases of some hard plastic miniatures to make them more stable. I’ve used modelling clay  for this before but it eventually exudes oils and I wanted a more permanent fix, as many were skeletons. I hope to start working on my remaining undead figures next, but after all the demons some clerics are needed for balance!

The first is a monk from the Ral Partha “1200 AD” line. (These are back in production, in fact!) It’s a nice sculpt and was pretty easy to paint.

partha-monk

Useless trivia: The 1200 AD line was originally called the 1100 AD line in early Ral Partha catalogs. By the time this guy was produced in 1983 or so, it was called 1200 AD. Sadly, he’s one of the figures that got pretty badly messed up by my cheap matte varnish. I’m glad I got a photo before sealing him.

Next up another Ral Partha figure. This one is cleric from a boxed set sold some time around 1981. The box had other adventurers, all very nicely done, and pre-size creep, so they are true 25mm like the monk above.

Ral Partha cleric

He suffered a bit but not as much from sealing. His face detail was always shallow and the sealer obscures it further; again I snapped this photo before the sealing. I’m not completely satisfied with the hood color but I wanted him to be a little more colorful and thought it might contrast well with his darker skin tone. Unfortunately his sidelong glance is not very clear any more under the sealer. He’s based on a 20mm mosaic tile rather than a 1″ piece of matte board like the others. A similar variant is still being made by the revived Ral Partha, with a snake for a staff (!).

Next a Heritage “Dungeon Dwellers” cleric.

heritage-cleric

This one came in the Caverns of Doom boxed set, and I had to replace both his hands. The replacements are a little big (most figures have wacky proportion anyway) and this is especially noticeable with his tiny feet, but I think he looks ok. The original had an ankh in his right hand and an open left hand, but I gave him a cross and a vial of holy water! He’s got glossy sealer only in this photo too.

Lastly, a Citadel dwarf.

dwarf-cleric

He’s not really necessarily a cleric (he’s from the DC line of warriors) but he’s armed with a big hammer in his hand and a smaller hammer tucked into his belt on his back. He’s got some glossy sealer but no matte in this photo. He was one of the of lucky ones who did not get all frosty looking from the matte varnish.

Published in: on January 11, 2017 at 12:18 pm  Comments (1)  
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The last of the devils and demons

lastdevilswip

It’s been a while since I’ve had a chance to paint any miniatures. But on New Year’s Day I had some free time and decided to finish up the devils and demons in my collection. As you can see in the picture, I have a Reaper Bones marilith, a Reaper Bones female devil, a Grenadier efreet, a Ral Partha “gremlin,” a demon or gargoyle of unknown vintage (recast in plastic by WizKids for Mage Knight), a Ral Partha efreet, and two Heritage avenging angels. Apart from an incomplete figure or two, and some Mega Minis figures that look more like random monsters than demons, those are the last of the demons & devils.

The marilith is still not done. But the rest are finished. I didn’t take quite as much time as I sometimes would, such was my enthusiasm to get a category of minis finished.

Apologies in advance for the image quality — new phone, too much gloss in the sealant, and still figureing out the flash.

First up, the efreeti. Actually these were both figures I painted decades ago but stripped to repaint a bit more aesthetically. The Grenadier efreet is the last version they made for the Tomb of Spells set (I vastly prefer the older sculpt based directly on Trampier’s illustration but this guy is ok). The Ral Partha efreet I purchased some time around 1983 when I was on a family vacation to Baltimore. The three things about that trip that stand out are visiting the aquarium, paddling around the harbor with my brother (where we found a number of dead seagulls floating on the waves), and the incredible hobby shop in the mall on the harbor that had glass cases filled with miniatures from every manufacturer I knew of and many I never heard of. Any money I had at the time was spent there. I’m not sure what other minis I might have bought but I recall my brother getting an ogre and troll made by Castle Creations. I used the efreet as a half-ogre for a while. (all photos, click to embiggen)

efreeti

Next up are a trio of devils. The crouching figure may or may not be an original sculpt for WizKids’Mage Knight line. The guy with the spear is a very old Ral Partha. I couldn’t figure out a way to straighten his spear without removing it entirely and replacing it so I left it alone. The female devil is by Reaper.

3devils

The avenging angels are pretty unusual. I couldn’t find any painted examples in my googling, and they may be fairly rare. They were made for the Knights & Magic line, and would have come in a blister pack with one each of an angel with a flaming sword (like these), a spear, and a bow. I picked these up second-hand from a toolbox full of old minis at hobby shop that has since gone out of business (or at least gone online-only — Spellbinder’s of Kent, Ohio). The odd thing was there were only two wings, and when began assembling them I realized they were both the right wing. So one angel has plastic wings clipped from a plastic toy bird (the neat rounded feathers on the right) while the other took some reconstruction. I bent one wing into shape and added some Liquid Nails to the top edges so they look more symmetrical. They almost look like they were meant to be this way. I love the raggedness of these wings too — it seems like something out of a Terry Gilliam movie. (Actually, the bird-wings could be out of Brazil and the original wings out of The Fisher King, maybe).

angels1

Unrelated, but not appearing here before, I had a couple more minis that I painted over the summer and never photographed. They are a Reaper fire elemental and a very old Grenadier cleric. The cleric (who I always think of as Cedric the Cleric) lost his mace long ago and I replaced it with a somewhat oversized morningstar from the plastic Zvedza Orks kit.

clericandelemental1

Published in: on January 5, 2017 at 9:53 pm  Comments (3)  
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Repost: Old school figures part two: Minis on the web!

A longer version of this post originally appeared in 2010 but was in need of updating. I’m not completely done but here’s a start. Thanks to Anthony Emmel for bringing just how out of date this was to my attention!

A lot of miniatures people turn their noses up at old Grenadier and Heritage and Minifigs figures. I will grant that many modern figures, which take advantage of sculpting and molding techniques unavailable to the original manufacturers (and an aesthetic sharpened by the intervening years of fantasy illustration, comics, etc.) are often quite impressive. The level of animation, and the overall quality are amazing. The crisp detail, and the fact the pieces fit perfectly make them a joy to assemble and paint. But I still love the old school minis too. They often have a gritty realism modern figures just lack.

Heritage Models has a number of sites and yahoo groups devoted to it. There’s Dungeon Dwellers info, a great site for all things Dungeon Dwellers. If you didn’t know, this line would have been their “Dungeons & Dragons” line, but the license agreement never got signed and instead Grenadier would get the license for AD&D miniatures. There are several Heritage Yahoo groups, devoted to collecting the figures, providing documentation, and so on. Disciples of Heritage and the Heritage Models Reference groups are worth checking out. The collectors Yahoo groups for Ral Partha and Grenadier are great too.

I love and hate Games Workshop/Citadel figures. They are certainly nice looking. The only things not to like are the scale creep and cost. Citadel minis, back in the late 1980s, were the first figures I had that just didn’t quite fit with my Grenadier, Ral Partha, and Heritage stuff. Ral Partha was always a slight bit smaller than the others, but with Citadel I could tell the scale was actually shifting. Of course nowadays, almost all modern figures are a little bigger than before. “28mm”, “30mm”, “heroic 28mm scale”, even “32mm” are bandied about, whereas in the olden days everyone claimed to be making 25mm figures, whether that 25mm was toes-to-eyes, toes-to-tip of head, or just 25mm=6′. Some of my newer Reaper and Kenzer Co. figures absolutely tower over my old figures. And that is too bad, because no-one chooses a Ral Partha figure any more for their PC in the games I’ve been playing. They just look too runty. In fact we’ve been using a Ral Partha mounted fighter as a Dwarf on a pony, and I’m probably the only one who realizes the figure was “meant” to be a human! Still, when Citadel was making RPG minis instead of exclusively Warhammer/Warhammer 40k/other branded IP minis, they made some seriously awesome figures. And they made so many that there is a whole wiki just for Citadel, which rivals the Lost Minis Wiki! But readers of this blog may be more interested in another site that just focuses on Citadel’s old AD&D/D&D lines.

The Lost Minis Wiki was created last year with the explicit intention of covering all the out-of-production lines and models, and I can kill hours there. Update: The wiki is now also awash in newer and current lines. Mission creep, I guess. But you can still find lots of old stuff. The Lost Minis Wiki has vast amounts of unpainted lead, but we really want to see the painted stuff, right?

Stuff of Legends hasn’t been updated much lately, but as far as I know it was the first site devoted to classic minis. Another great site is the Blue Mule, which showcases well-loved and well-painted old figures. Silverblade’s Suitcase has a collection of very nice looking figures too, many of them very old. There is even one site devoted just to dwarves!

Anyway I found a legal copy of the Armory’s Buying Guide to Fantasy Miniatures at the Mega Minis Magazine site. There is a stunning array of old catalogs there to drool over, with images of miniatures that you can only hope to scrounge up at a convention or eBay. But if you love classic minis, the good news is that there are both new lines that are inspired by older lines, and a few companies still casting the classic figures. Update: although Mega Minis is out of business, the first link still works. The second is now a link to the Wayback Machine’s backup.

Center Stage is still getting off the ground but I have high hopes for their Swords & Wizardry line. Update: Center Stage had a disastrous and possibly fraudulent Kick Starter campaign that did the company in, but good news, the minis are being cast be Pacesetter Games.

You’d have to be living under a rock not to know about Otherworld Miniatures, which is creating minis directly inspired by the classic illustrations of Sutherland, Trampier, etc. Update: But they are in 28mm scale, not classic 25mm. 

Classic Miniatures is recasting many Heritage models, and also has a number of interesting things in the pipeline, including “Unreleased figures by Dave Sutherland III.” Update: Link broken; some classic Heritage and Archive recasts are available; check out the Disciples of Heritage yahoo group for info.

Games Figures Inc. is producing some Minifigs, some Heritage Models not owned by Classic Miniatures, and a few other ranges. Update: link broken; GFI apparently out of business. 😦

Ironwind Metals, which rose from the ashes of Ral Partha, is producing some of the old RP lines. Update: Ral Partha is more or less resurrected here.

Thunderbolt Mountain, Tom Meier’s company, is producing figures similar to his Ral Partha classics, but in a more “modern” 28mm scale. Update: also 30mm scale Arthurian stuff, and some true 25mm.

Mirliton, an Italian company, is producing some of the latest Grenadier lines, but sadly not the old Wizzards & Warriors/AD&D lines. Update: Some older Fantasy Lords and earlier models are in fact available.

Mega Minis produces original figures as well as an extensive array of older lines. They are providing a great service but I wish they didn’t cancel lines after short runs. Update: Mega Minis, sadly, is out of business. Their molds may have been picked up by other companies. Their original stuff is now at Johnnyborg Castings. These seem to be Kick Starters so caveat emptor.

Viking Forge is producing classic Asgard minis … the ones illustrated in the Armory ads in old Dragon Magazines!

Next time, maybe some more revived  or old-school style lines? I wanted to add Barony Miniatures, Max Carr’s company which republished the Warlord rules and had a new line of medievals similar to his Heritage sculpts but the site is offline since the spring of 2016. 😦

Published in: on January 4, 2017 at 9:23 am  Comments (3)  
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Die Geburt Krampuskind

nat-der-kra-2

In just ten days, I believe, we’ll be celebrating the nativity of the Krampuskind. Left to right we see a manger animal (Reaper Miniatures), an angel (Ral Partha), Joseph (Heritage Models), the Krampuskind (Dollar Tree),  Mary and two magi (Metal Magic), and a third magi (Grenadier).

Krampus gloriam in excelsis!

Amen!

Click the image below to embiggen…

nativity der krampuskind

Published in: on December 14, 2015 at 11:15 pm  Comments (3)  
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Heritage paints, part two

So I was on such a roll painting this weekend that I forgot to stop and take WIP pictures, but here are the Tiki Golem and centipede finished.

The Tiki Golem, in hindsight, probably should have had darker, redder tint to the body; more like the wood of his weapon.  Still he looks ok.  I did minimal highlighting with a mix of ivory and the Heritage brown.  The other colors are all regular craft paints.

tikigolemOne really nice touch on this figure is a little nest in the golem’s back.  I can’t really be sure what the animal is meant to be but I thought it was maybe some kind of possum or primate?  Porcupine? No idea.  I just painted him grey with a pink snoot.

tikigolem-2

Click to embiggen. What is that critter?

The centipede had a problem when I applied the sealer (in this case, Pledge Tile & Vinyl Floor Finish, which is the new brand used for the Future Floor Finish formula).  The Heritage paint dissolved into the finish!  This did not happen with the brown on the golem, so it must be something specific to the red paint.  Arg.

centipede-1This muddied the overall look of the figure, but it’s so small it doesn’t matter all that much.  Next time I’ll use a spray-on sealer, because the brushwork with the floor finish smeared the paint.

FWIW, I began trying the Future Floor Finish because I learned that spray-on sealers interact with polymer clay and leave a tacky finish, but the Future formula (basically acrylic) does not interact with polymer clay like Sculpey.  I am using it on metal now too because it is much to cold to use spray sealers right now, and the floor finish has no toxic fumes.

Anyway, this does leave me with some questions about the formula for Heritage Colors.  I’d heard somewhere that Heritage contracted with a paint company that also sold house paints and other industrial grade paints.  The plot thickens…

Published in: on February 17, 2014 at 8:53 pm  Leave a Comment  
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Heritage paints, part one

Some time ago one of the guys who used to make molds for Heritage Models sent me some pots of paint from Heritage’s paint line.  Many of them were dried out beyond recovery, but a few were still usable.  He’d added some water to them before he sent them, and they seem a bit thinner than the paints which came in the Paint & Play sets (which were the only Heritage paints I had back in the day).  However, for my purposes that works fine, as I wanted to try out the “stain painting” method described in the painting guides Heritage published back in the day*, which call for watered down paint applied directly over the white primer they sold (& which I am 90% certain was just white gesso).  So here are a couple of shots of my first step, applying the watery but still very intensely pigmented paints to a couple of Reaper minis.

A wood golem, or animated Tiki; behind it a bottle of 30+ year old paint and a bottle of new gesso.

A wood golem, or animated Tiki; behind it a bottle of 30+ year old paint and a bottle of new gesso.

You can see that the paint settled in like a very dark wash.  The next is a giant(ish) centipede, also by Reaper, painted with some crimson paint from the same line.  I see now that a couple of spots were missed.

heritage-crimsonThe idea is that crevices and relief get slightly different densities of paint, darker in the recess and lighter on the higher ground.  The next steps will be to add details in other colors and black line the borders.  I’ll post more WIP pictures as I continue.  Drybrushing and additional washes for shading are also recommended, but for a base coat, this is isn’t bad and I can see skipping those steps if you’re painting an army.

My impression so far of the Heritage paints though is that they are very good — the pigment seems extremely finely ground, the colors are very intense, and as thinned as they are, they remain fairly opaque.  It could be that the crappy craft paints I use have just set the bar really low, but I remember using PollyS and Armory paints back in the day and these seem to be as good or better.

=======================================

*The stain painting method was promoted, and probably invented, by Duke Siefried though Heritage staff artist Dave Helber wrote some of the guides and maybe added some additional tips.

Published in: on February 16, 2014 at 8:51 am  Leave a Comment  
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Devils, demons, and the mushroom king

A-june29groupThis weekend I finished up some guys I’d been working on intermittently.  I have just a few demons and devils left to paint now!

So first, a plastic miniature.  This was made by Wiz Kids for the MageKnight line, and is a copy of a Ral Partha sculpt.  Apparently Wiz Kids got a number of Ral Partha sculpts into its line, which I suppose was a consequence of RP going “out of business” after FASA bought them.

B-plastic-demon-1Left, a Games Workshop Lord of the Rings figure (he’ll be several of these pictures for scale).  Center, the Wiz Kids figure, and right, an original Ral Partha demon in lead.  He came in a set of three devils and you could choose from four heads for them.  The head he got seems like the most obvious choice (the others were much smaller horned heads and a goat-head).   Apart from having no integral base of his own, the plastic guy is a little smaller and his left hand is in a different position.  It’s harder to see here but their knees and legs are in slightly different positions too.  I’m not sure if there was actually a variant RP sculpt or if Wiz Kids just needed to alter him a little to fit into a mold (lead and metal figures are cast in soft rubber molds and can have a more complicated shape; plastic is usually cast from metal molds so the figure has to have no contours that would get caught in the mold).

The next guy is a really old Heritage devil, which was sold in a boxed set (as well as in blister, I think, in the Knights & Magick line).  I got mine second hand somewhere.

C-heritagedevil2I like the armor, which was uncommon in older devils, and the integral fire on his base.

D-heritagedevil

Next up, a Ral Partha demon.  This guy was sculpted by Tom Meier, and released as a “Ral Partha Import” in the USA and as a Citadel miniature in the UK. With the whip and sword, he’s obviously referencing Tolkien’s Moria balrog.

E-rp-balrogHere he is next to a Games Workshop Lord of the Rings figure, for scale.

F-RP-demon1

I have two of this casting.  One I bought ages ago; the other was given to me along with a bunch of other old lead and pewter minis, and is the one the one I finally painted here.

G-2-rp-demonsI kind of like the contrast here; sort of positive and negative.

You might be thinking, “yeah, but why would you want two balrogs?”  You’re right, of course.  You’d really want four to give a party a good challenge!

H-balrog-class-of-84Left to right, a Grenadier Type VI demon; the “gargoyle” from the HeroQuest Milton Bradley/Games Workshop game, and the two RP/Citadel demons.

I-2-grenadier-demonsThe last two demons are from the Grenadier “Action Art” Fantasy Fiends set.  I had them painted sort of randomly before, with greenish fur on one and grey on the other they didn’t really look like demons so much as mutant bears or something.

J-pack-of-gren-demonsI was lucky enough to get a third copy of this guy, heavily converted by Scottsz.  He added a tail, built up the nose and arms, and covered the weird ridge on its back with fur.  Here’s the backs:

K-pack-of-gren-demons-rThese three should be the stuff of nightmares.  Those claws would be 2 feet long in scale.

Now moving on from the demons, here’s a banshee made by Rafm.

L-rafm-bansheeAnd finally, I’m pleased to say the mushroom men finally have a leader.  No more directionless wandering and disorganized assaults on villages.  Behold the mushroom king!

M-mushroomking2He’s a Reaper mini, and nicely made with a lot of little details.

N-mushroomkingAgain for scale with a human.

And finally the grand procession of myconids:

O-rollin-w-shroomies

Published in: on June 29, 2013 at 7:12 pm  Comments (3)  
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Grenadier bugbears, Heritage kolbolds

Just finished the last of my bugbears and kobolds (I think!)

The more I look at the Grenadier bugbears, the more I think they are my favorite bugbears (although the Otherworld minis are a close second).  Although these guys were originally sold in blister packs with two axe-wielders and one sword-wielder, somehow I have three swords and one axe!  I think the issue is that the sword-wielder came in the “Action Art” boxed set too, so there are just more of them out there.  The axe guy has an extra-large head, but the fact that he has an axe also helps tie him in with the plastic ‘bugbears’ from the Dragonstrike game that I have.

Grenadier bugbears

Grenadier bugbears

oldboy

I figured the best way to make the sword guys distinguishable would be their shields, but then thought it might be cool if they were all the same…and finally settled on making one an ‘elder’ by adding some grey to his fur.

I went ahead and touched up a few WotC plastic figures I use as bugbears too — the one with a hammer was sold as a bugbear, but the other two were supposed to be orcs.  3e/4e orcs have a lot of hair, so painting them brown pretty much did the trick.

WotC-bugbears

So here’s all 15 bugbears in my collection:

bugbears

I’m not sure if I like the Heritage kobolds more than other manufacturer’s kobolds, but the Heritage figures have a lot of character, despite being in the same pose.

My kobolds represent just two of the four poses Heritage cast.  I got them from a variety of sources second-hand so I’m not surprised; this may also be a case of the blister and boxes having different contents, so the clubs and axes are just more common than the sword and javelin variants I’ve seen online.

heritage-kobolds

The Grenadier kobolds I have, which are from the mid-1980s I think, are similar but much slimmer and have no tails.  I also filled in the ranks of my kobolds with some Games Workshop skinks.  I can’t quite place why I started painting them all blue, but does help distinguish them from goblins.

koboldsI have Grenadier kobold mounted on a small dragon too, but forgot to include him in the group shot.

Published in: on February 2, 2013 at 10:04 pm  Comments (2)  
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Heritage paints

As I’ve mentioned before, I’m involved in the OSFMapa and so far I’ve written a couple of articles for it.  Some of the other guys’ articles are amazing showcases of old, rare, and/or finely painted miniatures.  I don’t have very good photography skills, and although some of my minis are quite old, I don’t think I have many rarities.  So instead I’ve written about painting guides from the 70s and 80s, and last time I focused on Heritage USA’s paints and painting guides.   Actually I didn’t have a lot to say about the paints, I mostly did what I could to find out what Heritage’s signature primer was (spoiler: it almost certainly gesso, although one source insists it was house paint base…).  Anyway my research into Heritage couldn’t be complete without asking Willard Dennis a lot of questions, and honestly he’s the main source of info in that article. Willard is familiar to anyone who delves into Heritage and its history, because he is very generous with his time, answer all kinds of questions about the company.  He worked as a mold maker for Heritage and unlike some of the former employees, he is willing to talk!  If you poke around the two Yahoo! groups devoted to Heritage Models, you’ll find that he answers a lot of the questions with no nonsense.

Anyway since I started asking him about Heritage paints, he remembered that he had some bottles somewhere, and even offered to send them to me if I’d cover the postage!  Who could turn that down?  30+ year old miniatures paint, some of it still salvageable!

Opening the bottles, I found that about half of them were beyond saving, but the other half were in pretty good shape.  Willard had mixed water into all the bottles, and I’ve since read that maybe adding water to old acrylics is not the best way to restore them (it introduces bacteria and/or fungal spores which can grow in the paint, and too much water can mess up the polymer emulsion of the paint base), but they actually seem quite useable.  The pigment is intense, and the paints seem to dry rather quickly (I had a small spill when I opened the package!).

The paints included several ‘specialties’ from Heritage’s sci-fi and fantasy lines, including a ‘phosphor’ (glow-in-the-dark) that looks like it is still good.  There were also a fluorescent ‘laser’ paint that is dried up, but which reminded me of the short-lived attempt I made to paint some minis in fluorescent Polly-S paints for use under black lights (no, really!).  Finally there was a ‘ground work’ paint which Willard explained was basically dark green/brown paint with flocking mixed in.  Heritage offered other interesting specialty paints, that I don’t think any other company tried: ‘crackle’ paint, ‘mithril’ which was apparently metallic flacks in a clear base, and more.  They certainly weren’t afraid to experiment.  I don’t quite have a complete palette of Heritage paints, but I’ll try to use them to paint up some old Heritage minis I have.  Of course I’ll try to use the ‘stain painting’ method Heritage developed. 🙂

The catalogs I’ve found don’t list the large bottles except for a few utility colors (including primers, varnishes, and ‘ground work’) — I’m not sure if the large bottles of other colors, with the fantasy/sci-fi labels, were actually sold in stores or just something Willard got as an employee.  I forgot to ask about that.

Here’s a shot of the label on the Sci-fi/Fantasy paints:

Opposite the wizard is a space-suit wearing sci-fi character.

I think the paint survived so long in part because they’d been left closed for most of the 30 or so years they were in Willard’s possession — he admits that he was not all that into painting.  I also noticed that the lids, which are metal, have a small rubber dome inside them, which must have served as a gasket to give the jars a great seal.  The large bottles are soft plastic and the small jars are a hard plastic.  I used to get Polly-S paints in similar jars to the small ones and they always had problems with drying out.  Pretty much every other paint from back then just had flat pieces of glossy cardboard under the lids, and they always absorbed paint, tore, and lost the ability to form a good seal.  The Heritage paints, with their built-in rubber gaskets, were perfectly designed to keep paint from drying out.  I will re-use the jars that I can’t save for that reason.

The bottles all smelled a bit like bong water to me, but it could just be old cigarette smoke or other garage smells.  I hesitate to wash them off though because I’d hate to ruin the original labels.

Published in: on July 14, 2012 at 8:00 am  Comments (3)  
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Jeremy Friesen - a poor soul consumed by gaming.

Age of Dusk

Roleplaying, reviews and associated paraphernalia.

Roll to Disbelieve

"We are here on Earth to fart around. Don't let anybody tell you any different."--Kurt Vonnegut

A Book of Creatures

A Complete Guide to Entities of Myth, Legend, and Folklore

Making the Past

Diary of an apprentice swordsmith

Ancient & Medieval Wargaming

Using De Bellis Antiquitatis, with the odd diversion...

Riffing Religion

Prophets should be mocked. I'm doing my part.

Cirsova

An encyclopedia of the Cirsovan empire, thoughts on Gaming, Music and more.

2 Warps to Neptune

Surveying the Gen X landscape and the origins of geek

Inside the Shadowbox

Rolling the dice. Writing the words. Pushing the buttons. Eating the bacon. Smiling and waving.

daggerandbrush

Miniature painting, wargaming terrain creation and more

Fractalbat

A lair for gaming, sci-fi, comics, and other geekish pursuits.

tenfootpole.org

I bought this stuff and read it so you don't have to.

Role Play Craft

Crafting ideas, options, and modules for your role playing campaign.

The Rambling Roleplayer

A collection of advice, essays, and rambling rants about tabletop gaming and other geekiness. Often updated Monday-ishly.

Sheppard's Crook

The occasional blog of a closet would -be wargamer and modeller

10 Bad Habits

Probably not the Justin Howe you were looking for

The Weekly Sift

making sense of the news one week at a time

inthecitiesdotcom

Just another WordPress.com site

Lost in Time

"What happened to Claw Carver?"

chieflyill

gaming, graphics, and genrefication

Stuffed Crocodile

Mazes, Martians, Mead

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